A brief chat with… …Andrew Spicer

 

Andrew Spicer introduces the new kids on the block in the world of classic vehicle auctions, Yorkshire company Dee, Atkinson & Harrison.

Words: Tim Britton Photographs: Dee, Atkinson & Harrison  

Thrust into the world of auctioneering straight from further education, Andrew Spicer eventually found himself in the wonderful world of old motorcycles, albeit via jewellery and fine art.

Andrew Spicer poses on a 1936 Norton ES2, sold last year for £10,000.

Though part of the motorcycle team at his previous employers, Andrew joined Yorkshire’s Dee, Atkinson & Harrison as a furniture specialist. During one of his calls he was shown a collection of old motorcycles the client wanted to move and suggested they could handle the sale. An opportunity to take over a vacant auction spot at Harrogate was taken and Dee, Atkinson & Harrison was launched into the classic vehicle auction world. Drawing on his previous experience, Andrew aims to provide his clients with the best service possible and acknowledges research is most vital when dealing with old vehicles.

How did you become involved in the auction business?

I went straight from school to the Southampton College of Higher Education and undertook the first Fine Arts and Chattels professional qualification under the Incorporated Society of Valuers and Auctioneers (later Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors). After completing that, I went to work for Phillips Auctioneers of Bond Street, London (now taken over by Bonhams) in their jewellery department and progressed as my knowledge expanded, ending up in Chester as an auctioneer and valuer of jewellery, watches and silver.

Read more in the May issue of TCM – on sale now!

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