5 July 2013
I’ve read your article Designing for the Future (June 2013). You have written that Villiers had taken out a patent on two or more overhead valves for four-stroke engine design (single camshaft)

May I remind you that Rover had an even more advanced construction in 1924 and 1926. Peter August Poppe designed a hemispherical cylinder head carrying the valves inclined at an angle of 45º. These were operated by an overhead camshaft that operated the inlet valves direct – through rockers – while the exhaust valves on the opposite side of the head were actuated by horizontal tappets. This idea was applied on both the 14/45 (four-cylinder) and the 16/50hp (six-cylinder) cars. One of the few disadvantages was leaking oil from the cylinder head.

In the hard economic times of the 1930s, Rover concentrated on building a smaller range and newer models and stopped building the 14/45 and 16/50 cars. Subsequently, the original idea was sold on to BMW. Here the design was further developed and materialised in the 328 sports cars.

May I congratulate you on a super magazine.

JCAM Tabink, Holland

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41-08 - August 2014

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